Monthly Archives: March 2012

How fast is the economy growing?

BC Appelbaum thinks it is growing faster than we knew.

A really smart, short piece here on why we’ve seen job growth, but not GDP growth.

Leave a comment

Filed under Issue in the News

Wind map

This is just fun, so I’m sharing it with you. It’s a map of the winds that are currently blowing throughout the US.

Enjoy!

Leave a comment

Filed under Just for Fun

Homework and Rough Draft

This is a reminder that homework in Chapters 7 and 8 is due in class on Friday.

In addition, a rough draft of your paper is due next Friday, April 6 at the beginning of class. My expectation for this draft is thus:

  • All elements of the paper should be in place, though not necessarily complete. This includes (but not necessarily limited to): introduction, literature review, data description, methods, results, and conclusions.
  • I fully expect the content of the paper to change over the following month, but at this point, you should be able to talk at length about what you have done, what you see, what you expect to do as we come into the final month of classes.
  • I imagine this draft will be in the 7-12 page range, but maximum of 20. I will not read or grade more than 20 pages on this or the final paper. Any parts of the paper present in pages exceeding 20 will be considered missing and your grade will fall.
  • I expect that you will have incorporated suggestions from your outline and regression write-up into your paper. Merely cutting and pasting with no changes or evolution is not a sign of progress and will negatively affect your grade.

Leave a comment

Filed under Assignment

Freakonomics

There’s been a big debate on economics blogs this week about Freakonomics. I thought I’d share a recent installment. I’ll come back and link to the other pieces of the story a bit later. It just keeps getting weirder and weirder.

I know we haven’t read a lot of the book yet, but things to think about as we move forward.

Don’t forget the Finance Symposium tonight.

Leave a comment

Filed under Issue in Class, Issue in the News, Just for Fun

Modeling and predicting coups

So, it appears there was a coup today in Mail. Details are still coming in, but I thought I would point you all to this blog post by Jay Ulfelder. It has a good summary of “collect indicators, model, predict” that shows Mali had a relatively high risk of coup this year.

Enjoy!

Update: More on the coup from Reuters here.

Leave a comment

Filed under Issue in the News, Just for Fun

Gettysburg Finance Symposium

Welcome back! This week, the Economics Department will host the annual Finance Symposium. This year’s guests are Eric Hanushek and Andy Reschovsky, two economists who research education finance reform. I think it will be a lively and engaging debate. I highly encourage you to attend.

It will be this Thursday, March 22nd in Masters 110 (Mara) at 7:00pm.

If you do attend, blog about it! Again, this will count as an extra credit or make-up blog post if you missed one. As you listen to their arguments, think about what sort of econometric tools they might have used to come to their conclusions, what kind of hypotheses are they making about their data, what kind of assumptions go into their arguments.

Leave a comment

Filed under Just for Fun

*UPDATED* Writing Assignment #8

**UPDATE: This writing assignment will be due on Friday, March 30 at the beginning of class.

Read Chapter 5 of Poor Economics. Offer a brief (2-3 sentence) summary and answer the following questions.

  1. Pick a statistic out of the chapter and make a hypothesis about the statistic. Show how you would test the hypothesis.
  2. Design a regression model that would further test your hypothesis, conditional on other variables. (Note: you don’t have actually test this, just discuss what the model would look like)
  3. In class this week, we talked/will talk about dummy variables. How might you add a dummy variable to this regression?
  4. What would you expect the dummy variable to tell you? How would you know whether it was statistically significant?

Leave a comment

Filed under Assignment